Expert Lectures

The Conference Committee is pleased to promote the Expert Lectures that will be presented at the conference.

Expert lectures provide didactic content on a focused topic related to family nursing research, education, or practice

First Concurrent Session

(Education)
Graduate Family Nursing Education Position Statement: A Report on Status and Development

(Research/Practice)
Family Nursing Knowledge Translation Research: Lessons Learned

(Research)
The Art and Science of Data Visualization: A Resource for Family Researchers

(Research)
Choosing a Methodological Approach and Methods when Undertaking Qualitative Research with Child, Young People and Families

Second Concurrent Session

(Research)
Quantitative Family Data Analysis

(Research)
Using Focused Ethnography to Study Family Management of Health and Illness

(Practice)
Where are the Spiritual Care Practices in Family Nursing?:  Do not despair, they are present whenever……!!

(Practice – presented in Spanish)
Sustainable Caring Family: A family nursing approach to transform health for caring families



(Education)
Graduate Family Nursing Education Position Statement: A Report on Status and Development

Donna Miles Curry, RN, PhD, PCNS-BC
Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio USA

To complement the 2013 IFNA Statement on Pre-licensure Family Nursing Education, the Education Committee tackles the development a position statement on family nursing education in graduate programs from 2015-2015 with anticipated approval by the IFNA board in 2017.  This current status of this position statement will be presented as well as the challenges of development.   Development of the position statement includes a critical review of the literature and consultation with experts in graduate nursing.   The position statement is based on the components of a professional educational curriculum – philosophy, outcomes, content, strategies and evaluation. It concludes with a pedagogical model.



(Research/Practice)
Family Nursing Knowledge Translation Research: Lessons Learned

Fabie Duhamel, RN, PhD
University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec Canada

While there has been continued growth in family nursing knowledge, the complex process of implementing and sustaining family nursing in health care settings continues to be a challenge for family nursing researchers. There is a critical need for more research methods and research evidence about how to best move family nursing knowledge into action. This Expert Lecture presents lessons learned from three recent research studies that used a knowledge translation model to promote practice changes in health care settings. Methodological and clinical issues are addressed that provide a guide for future research studies designed to change practice in the clinical setting.



(Research)
The Art and Science of Data Visualization: A Resource for Family Researchers

Nancy Havill, CNM, PhD
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

Over 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual. Visual information is retained at a rate more than three times that conveyed via text or speech because our brains are prewired to visually interpret relationships between objects. Configuring complex data sets, such as those associated with family research, into attractive visualizations renders the data more accessible and understandable, and avoids the cognitive overload associated with processing written or spoken information. This lecture will present an overview on the art and science of data visualizations for family research analysis and dissemination.



(Research)
Choosing a Methodological Approach and Methods when Undertaking Qualitative Research with Child, Young People and Families

Alison Rodriguez, PhD
Joanna Smith, PhD
Linda Milnes, PhD
Veronica Swallow, PhD
University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Qualitative methods are useful for exploring the complexities of social, economic, political and environmental factors that affect health and well-being, as well as healthcare from a recipient’s perspective, and are particularly suited to undertaking research with children, young people and families. Making informed decisions about the design, and data collection and analysis methods are not easy because of the diverse range of qualitative methods, each with different ontological and epistemological underpinnings, perspectives and purposes. This workshop will enable participants to consider the rationale for decisions in relation to choosing the methodological approach and appropriate methods to meet the study aims.
—————————————————————————————————————————————

(Research)
Quantitative Family Data Analysis

George J. Knafl, PhD
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

This workshop will address family data, that is, data from multiple family members, and quantitative approaches for analyzing such data that account for correlation within responses from members of the same family. Family data require the same kinds of analyses as for other non-family data, including summary statistics, regression, analysis of variance, mediation, moderation, factor analysis, and cluster analysis. However, standard methods that assume independent observations require adjustment to use with family data to account for intra-familial correlation. A survey will be provided of family data types and analysis methods along with example analyses based on actual family data sets.



(Research)
Using Focused Ethnography to Study Family Management of Health and Illness

Roberta S. Rehm, PhD, RN, FAAN
University of California San Francisco, USA

Researchers can use focused ethnographic methods to investigate the complex challenges facing families as they navigate health and illness of family members. Ethnographic methods of interview, observation, and examination of materials and documents are familiar, but in focused ethnography aims are specific and often directed to provide data that can be turned toward practical purposes such as development or cultural tailoring of interventions, modification of institutional policies, or understanding family responses to specific health or social challenges. Using examples from completed or in-process studies, Dr. Rehm will analyze and explain the process and outcomes of focused ethnographic research.



(Practice)
Where are the Spiritual Care Practices in Family Nursing?:  Do not despair, they are present whenever……!!

Lorraine M Wright, RN, PhD
Univeristy of Calgary, Canada

Family nurses do practice in the spiritual domain! As healers of illness suffering, spiritual care practices are foundational in family nursing even if not recognized as such. It has been determined from research and clinical practice that when suffering is softened, family healing can occur.  From 40 years of clinical practice and study, I will offer the most effective spiritual care practices that can invite illness healing highlighted with actual clinical and personal illness narratives. Spiritual care practices can occur whenever a foundation of therapeutic conversations are brought forth in a context of love and curious compassion is evident.



(Practice)
Sustainable Caring Family: A family nursing approach to transform health for caring families

(Presented in Spanish)
Ana Canga, PhD, RN
Nuria Esandi, PhD, RN
University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain

Chronic diseases and long-term care context requires family nurses to share the illness and care trajectory with the family and to help them to travel it together. Most recent family models emphasize the importance of understanding the family’s view of their world as a guide for nursing care.
The SCF model advocates for achieving what is called ‘Sustainable Caring Family’ (SCF): ‘families which can carry out long term care without exhausting its physical, emotional, relational and spiritual resources and continue their family life project, based on their family strengths and using those resources that positively reinforce their caring experience’. For this to be achieved the SCF model suggests specific areas where nurse can complete exhaustive assessment and develop interventions aligned with family goals and unique circumstances. The SCF’ philosophy relies on ‘providing families with the necessary skills and strategies to accept and live with the condition in the best way possible based on a global commitment of all involved’.

This lecture, therefore, provides content on how the SCF is being integrated into research, education and practice.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail